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“This is a major new development in Japan’s employment paradigm, as new graduates find it increasingly difficult to get a foothold on the career ladder as regular employees,” Kingston and Machiko Osawa, a professor at Japan Women's University, write in “Risk and Consequences: The Changing Japanese Employment Paradigm,” an essay in In a culture that places such an emphasis on men being breadwinners, this has serious implications for marriage and childbearing.Men who don’t have regular jobs are not considered desirable marriage partners; even if a couple wants to get married, and both have irregular jobs, their parents will likely oppose it, according to Ryosuke Nishida, a professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology who has written about unemployment among young workers.But it is more of an obstacle for marriage if a man doesn’t have a good job—roughly 70 percent of women quit working after they have their first child, and depend on their husband’s salary for some time.Women in Japan’s big cities say they’re getting tired of the lack of available men.The event was part of an initiative that Zwei was putting on to make them interested in life—and men—outside of Tokyo.Zwei’s business model is based on matching women in Japan’s big cities with men in other areas of the country, where men are more likely to have good jobs and be considered viable partners.While in Tokyo, I visited an event put on by Zwei, a matchmaking company.Dozens of women clustered in a small studio to take a cooking class featuring food from Miyazaki Prefecture, in southern Japan.

But the shrinking economic opportunities stem from a larger trend that is global in nature: the rise of unsteady employment.But there’s another, simpler explanation for the country’s low birth rate, one that has implications for the U.S.: Japan’s birth rate may be falling because there are fewer good opportunities for young people, and especially men, in the country’s economy.Irregular workers in Japan are sometimes referred to as “freeters,” which is a combination of the word , which means “worker.” According to Kingston, the rise of irregular workers in Japan began in the 1990s, when the government revised labor laws to enable the wider use of temporary and contract workers hired by intermediary firms.Then, as globalization put more pressure on companies to cut costs, they increasingly relied on a temporary workforce, a trend that intensified during the Great Recession.