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(Shiho Fukada, a photographer, has documented the lives of these “refugees.”) Others with irregular jobs live with their parents or go on welfare.POSSE calculates that irregular employees earn on average about

(Shiho Fukada, a photographer, has documented the lives of these “refugees.”) Others with irregular jobs live with their parents or go on welfare.POSSE calculates that irregular employees earn on average about $1,800 a month, but spend much of that money on rent, paying back their college loans, and paying into Japan’s social-security program. About a quarter of Japan’s college graduates—a proportion that roughly corresponds with the share of students who go to big-name universities—are set for life in good jobs, he told me. “Men in their 20s, they don’t have an idea of having families or a house,” Makoto Iwahashi, another POSSE member, told me.The company advertised itself as a great place to work, but Matsubara, who was a wrestler in college, told me it soon became evident that it was anything but. on paper, Matsubara said he was required to work until late at night almost every day.Employees were required to sign off at 7 p.m., even if they were still working, and were given i Pads so that they could do so even if they were out of the office at meetings.About 30 percent of irregular workers in their early 30s are married, compared to 56 percent of full-time corporate employees, according to Kingston.

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(Shiho Fukada, a photographer, has documented the lives of these “refugees.”) Others with irregular jobs live with their parents or go on welfare.

POSSE calculates that irregular employees earn on average about $1,800 a month, but spend much of that money on rent, paying back their college loans, and paying into Japan’s social-security program. About a quarter of Japan’s college graduates—a proportion that roughly corresponds with the share of students who go to big-name universities—are set for life in good jobs, he told me. “Men in their 20s, they don’t have an idea of having families or a house,” Makoto Iwahashi, another POSSE member, told me.

The company advertised itself as a great place to work, but Matsubara, who was a wrestler in college, told me it soon became evident that it was anything but. on paper, Matsubara said he was required to work until late at night almost every day.

Employees were required to sign off at 7 p.m., even if they were still working, and were given i Pads so that they could do so even if they were out of the office at meetings.

,800 a month, but spend much of that money on rent, paying back their college loans, and paying into Japan’s social-security program. About a quarter of Japan’s college graduates—a proportion that roughly corresponds with the share of students who go to big-name universities—are set for life in good jobs, he told me. “Men in their 20s, they don’t have an idea of having families or a house,” Makoto Iwahashi, another POSSE member, told me.The company advertised itself as a great place to work, but Matsubara, who was a wrestler in college, told me it soon became evident that it was anything but. on paper, Matsubara said he was required to work until late at night almost every day.Employees were required to sign off at 7 p.m., even if they were still working, and were given i Pads so that they could do so even if they were out of the office at meetings.About 30 percent of irregular workers in their early 30s are married, compared to 56 percent of full-time corporate employees, according to Kingston.

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It’s also led companies to feel that they can treat their regular workers poorly, because those workers feel so lucky to have a job, Konno told me.

People who hold them may earn enough money to support families, but they often don’t have much time to date, or to do anything but work, sleep, and eat. At POSSE, I met a young man named Jou Matsubara, who graduated from Rikkyo Daigaku, a prestigious private college in Japan.

Matsubara, who comes from a working-class family, thought he’d achieved the Japanese dream when he graduated from college and got a job at Daiwa House Group, a Japanese home builder.

While in Tokyo, I visited an event put on by Zwei, a matchmaking company.

Dozens of women clustered in a small studio to take a cooking class featuring food from Miyazaki Prefecture, in southern Japan.