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This was possible in the late '80s and early '90s through the use of anonymous FTP servers and through the Gopher protocol.At this time the internet was mainly an academic and military network and there was not widespread use of the internet.The rise of pornography websites offering photos, video clips and streaming media including live webcam access allowed greater access to pornography.On the Web, there are both commercial and free pornography sites.Before publication, Philip Elmer-De Witt used the research in a Time Magazine article, "On a Screen Near You: Cyberporn." findings were attacked by journalists and civil liberties advocates who insisted the findings were seriously flawed. Godwin recounts the episode in "Fighting a Cyberporn Panic" in his book Cyber Rights: Defending Free Speech in the Digital Age."Rimm's implication that he might be able to determine 'the percentage of all images available on the Usenet that are pornographic on any given day' was sheer fantasy" wrote Mike Godwin in Hot Wired. The invention of the World Wide Web spurred both commercial and non-commercial distribution of pornography.

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Pornographic images had been transmitted over the Internet as ASCII porn but to send images over network needed computers with graphics capability and also higher network bandwidth.

The anonymity made it safe and easy to ignore copyright restrictions, as well as protecting the identity of uploaders and downloaders.

Around this time frame, pornography was also distributed via pornographic Bulletin Board Systems such as Rusty n Edie's.

These BBSes could charge users for access, leading to the first commercial online pornography.

A 1995 article in The Georgetown Law Journal titled "Marketing Pornography on the Information Superhighway: A Survey of 917,410 Images, Description, Short Stories and Animations Downloaded 8.5 Million Times by Consumers in Over 2000 Cities in Forty Countries, Provinces and Territories" by a Carnegie Mellon University graduate student claimed, among other things, that (as of 1994) 83.5% of the images on Usenet newsgroups where images were stored were pornographic in nature. The student changed his name and disappeared from public view.