What was dating like in the 1930s

08 Apr

The cap seen below was quite popular for the working man.1930s Cap: Image courtesy of the University of Vermont Landscape Change Program and the Vermont State Archives. At the end of the 1920s and into the 1930s, the leather jacket with cap was a popular style.Before hooking up, there was “petting,” and everyone was doing it.

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Wide, padded shoulders, tapering sleeves, peaked lapels, and V-shaped neck all characterize the 1930s suit.From the way a woman should dress to the amount of alcohol she should have, and from how much she talks to her communication with the waiter, these rules were probably a woman’s worst nightmare -or best friend some may say.It started with falling birth rates in the early 20th century; whereas households of 10 children were the norm for previous generations, married couples began making a conscious choice to have smaller families."In the eyes of the authorities," Weigel writes, "women who let men buy them food and drinks or gifts and entrance tickets looked like whores, and making a date seemed the same as turning a trick." reports that "petting" joined the national lexicon in the 1920s, later defined by sexologist Alfred Kinsey as "deliberately touching body parts above or below the waist," writes Weigel.Her own grandfather, who dated in the 1930s, recalled teachers trying futilely to impose rules on extracurricular activities: 'If they let girls sit in their laps while 'joyriding,' they had to be sure 'to keep at least a magazine between them.'"Not long after, dates started to resemble scenes from with couples sharing ice cream and Coca-Cola, going to the movies, or driving up a remote hilltop for "parking." Although parents and teachers of the time perceived this behavior as a decline in morality, Weigel argues that dating is an ever-changing landscape that can't be judged by the previous generation's standards—something for anyone who's ever been Facebook shamed by a date to keep in mind.